From the monthly archives: mars 2012

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Hire two private investigators, make them follow each other.

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Go into a crowded elevator and say
« I bet you’re all wondering why I gathered you here »,
with a straight face.

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Make vanilla pudding. Put in mayo jar. Eat in public.

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Become a teacher. Make a test where every answer is « C ». Enjoy the show.

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Wait until someone is about to sneeze.
Right before they do, loudly scream « PIKA PIKAAAA!! ».

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Run into a store, ask what year it is.
When someone answers, yell « It worked! », and run out cheering.

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Buy a horse, name it « Oscar Takes the Lead », enter it in horse races.

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Buy a parrot, learn the parrot to say
« Help! I’ve been turned into a parrot! ».

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NASA‘s storied space shuttle program may be history but ships are still making bold voyages into space — at least, in Lego form.

A Romanian man built a Lego space shuttle and sent it on a mission toward the stars. And the miniature craft nearly made it to space, reaching a reported maximum altitude of 35,000 meters, or about 21 miles. Its journey is documented in an amazing YouTube video (below).

A regarder jusqu’à la fin !!!



Oaida affixed the Lego shuttle to a helium-filled balloon with a GPS and video camera attached. After launch, he followed the Lego shuttle by land in a car until the would-be spaceship left GPS range. The shuttle eventually landed about 240 kilometers, or 150 miles, away from its original takeoff point in Germany.

Oaida is Romainian, but said in a blog post that his home country had too much bureaucratic red tape to make conducting the feat from there practical. So he traveled to Germany, where authorities were apparently more receptive, to launch the mission.

“I’ve always been profoundly inspired by spaceflight,” Oaida wrote, “the Lego Shuttle was the only space program I could afford.”

NASA’s space shuttle program ended after 30 years when the shuttle Atlantis concluded its final voyage last July. Luckily, with people like Oaida, its spirit of innovation and exploration lives on.

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In collaboration with Lift and Near Future Laboratory, Interactive Things explores digital traces left by mobile phones in Ville Vivante.

Lines and paths flow from place to place in Geneva, Switzerland, showing how the people move in and out of the city during a 24-hour period.

It’s hard to say exactly what you’re seeing here because it does move so fast, and it probably means more if you live in or near Geneva, but speaking to the video itself, you have your highs and lows during the start and end of days.

It then cycles through a handful of views, namely one that looks like wind blowing through and another where particles shoot up from the ground.

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